Martin Schroeder

MD
  • Function: Specialist
  • Speciality: Vascular Surgery
  • Country: DE
  • Working place: Ruhr University Bochum Marienhospital Herne, Herne Germany , DE

Activities

Comment on Sep 06, 2020

giovanni solimeno commented on presentation Step by step thrombendarteriectomy of the common femoral artery with venous patchplasty.

»Hello Martin, thank you for your sharing. Seeing the movie, the plaque you removed seems to be prolonged towards the profunda femoris. When the situation is so, we always prefer to preserve (even during the final flushing) this artery with a Coonley technique, in which the arteriotomy, and therefore the patch angioplasty, is prolonged towards the profunda with a second eversion angioplasty of the first segment of the superficial artery. Second, do you routinary use an autologous vein patch ? Considering that the vein could be useful for a future bypass in case of disease evolution, we use it only in particular situations, such as obese patients or redo-Tea of scarred groins; we routinely prefer bovine pericardium.«
Comment on Jun 17, 2020

Amer Zanabili commented on presentation CERAB technique in AIOD lesion.

»Thanks Martin for your useful answers and explanations. In my opinion, the CERAB technique is a useful tool when there is a lesion like stenosis or thrombus at the level of the IMA. However, it has some disadvantages like more collateral need to be sacrificed with uncertain consequences (inferior mesenteric artery, lumbar arteries, accessory renal arteries); in up to 45 – 50% of cases it is necessary to use 4 or 5 stents, and it could be less practical when the aortic diameter is larger than 16 mm. Best regards and thanks again for your excellent work!!!«
Comment on Jun 17, 2020

Martin Schroeder commented on presentation CERAB technique in AIOD lesion.

»Dear Amer , thank you for your feedback and questions. 1) we use Bentley covered stents (Begraft Aortic) the reason for this is the large radial force and the corresponding diameter in the area of the aorta. In our case 16mm (11F) post dilation 18mm (BD Atlas Ballon) with easy adjustability. 2) normally you need 3 covered stents for the CERAB technique - which refers to the infrarenal aorta and the bifurcation of the iliac vessels. however, additional interventions in the iliac vessels are sometimes necessary in complex situations (TASC II D lesions with extension of the CS, chimney, coiling, etc.) In our case it was a bilateral occlusion of the ICA and IEA. In this case, a stent is particularly helpful in cases of severe calcification and possible dissection during revascularization and protects against an early re-occlusion. 3) predilatation, I think it makes sense to create a certain space for the sheats which are important to get the covered stents in place. Distal embolization is of course an issue, two comments to avoid: A) if you use a cut down in the area of the groin as access - flush. B) A preoperative CT angiography and the medical history should provide information about the duration of the occlusion. depending on that i would plan my procedure. Thank you again for your questions, best regards«
Comment on Jun 16, 2020

Amer Zanabili commented on presentation CERAB technique in AIOD lesion.

»Thanks Martin for sharing this interesting case. To create a debate around this technique, I would like to ask you some questions. 1. Which kind of CS have you used and the dimension of them? 2. In your clinical practice, in which percentage do you usually use more than 3 CS to perform the CERAB technique in complex AIOD? Was it necessary to perform any treatment in the external iliac or common femoral arteries in this case? 3. And the last one, do you always predilate the lesion before the stenting implantation? I usually avoid to do it to minimize the risk of distal embolization.«
Basic vascular surgery skills

Step by step thrombendarteriectomy of the common femoral artery with venous patchplasty

In this video we show you one of the most common vascular surgery open procedures step by step.  arterial thrombendarteriectomy with patchlasty forms the basis for many open vascular surgery procedures.
You will see a thrombendarteriectomy of the common femoral artery with the individual steps of the procedure and removal of the saphenous vein for venous patchplasty.

October 26, 2019 2 Comments
Comment on Apr 03, 2019

Martin Schroeder replied to your comment on presentation AV Fistula – Basic vascular surgery skills.

»Thank you for your question, but the answer to this is : no, neither. We don´t saw any problems after the anastomosis suture and in the intraoperative flow measurement with good results at the follow up. But the vein material is very elastic , so im totaly agree that you can give the vene more length if you would. Best regards Martin«
Comment on Nov 09, 2018

Luis Izquierdo Lamoca commented on presentation Recanalization techniques of chronic iliofemoral vein occlusions.

»This is a young woman who suffered a postpartum iliofemoral DVT and a failed lytic therapy attempt in another center. The cause was probably an underlying May-Thurner compression with a negative thrombophilia workup. As there were more than two venous segments affected we kept him in oral anticoagulation for 12 months and after long life aspirin In my practice I use these regimes: - NIVL: Bemiparine 3500 UI / SC at 6 and 24 hours after the procedure followed by aspirin 100 mg PO / 24 hours for 12 months. - CHRONIC DVT: Lesions involving ≤ 2 venous segments: Bemiparine 3500 UI / SC at 6 and 24 hours after the procedure followed by aspirin 100 mg PO a day for 12 months. Lesions involving ≥ 3 segments, thrombophilia, previous anticoagulant treatment and poor venous inflow: Bemiparin at weight-adjusted therapeutic dose / 24 hours SC for 15 days followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 12 months. - ACUTE DVT: Bemiparin at weight-adjusted therapeutic dose / 24 hours SC for 15 days followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 12 months.«
Comment on Jul 02, 2018

Martin Schroeder commented on presentation Hybrid atherectomy for the infrainguinal arteries: why, when and how?.

»Dear Theo Thank you for this excellent presentation. What possibilities do you have if you receive a recanalization subintimally, can you also use the hybrid atherectomy system or is it absolutely necessary to have a true lumen for the atherectomy? If yes - is there a good tip for this? Thanks in advance. Martin«
Comment on Jun 18, 2018

Theodosios Bisdas replied to your comment on presentation Hybrid atherectomy for the infrainguinal arteries: why, when and how?.

»Thank you Kostas! Regarding your questions: 1. It depends on the vessel that you treat; for SFA I would use the recommended Nitrix wire (Medtronic) or the hi-torque Iron Man (Abbott) and for the below-the-knee arteries more stiff wires like the Hi-Torque Extra S'port (Abbott) and Astato XS 20 (Asahi) 2. I do not use a DPD and I would not recommend it, because you may have problems between the proximal tip of the device and the wire of the filter. 3/4. At the moment I use atherectomy for tibial disease only in case of in-stent stenosis and severe recoil after PTA. If I perform atherectomy, then I would combine it with DCB. Do you have a different algorithm?«
Comment on Jun 07, 2018

Martin Schroeder replied to your comment on presentation 12 M Outcomes of the Veniti Vici Venous Stent System for iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis.

»First of all, thank you for your interesting comments Fernando. We know the closed cell design among others in the area of Carotis stents. Here are some comparisons and studies between open and closed cell stents. One of the benefits of the closed stent structure may be the prevention of re-thromboembolic events. This is one of the advantages associated with pelvic veins, especially MTS. The associated structural structure of the stent and its properties with regard to radial rigidity and flexibility are, in my opinion, further positive characteristics. Surely, however, further studies and head to head comparisons are needed here - as well as the open cell design stents have good results in terms of patency rates and properties. Second: The Cavafilter is not our standard and there are no Algorithms. We also use it only in the cases you specify (Cava / pronounced DVT or with pulmonary embolism). In the case of a lysis therapy, we leave this until the end. In individual cases, you can aspirate existing thrombi before removal of the filter with appropriate devices (eg Penumbra) to avoid re-embolization. Once again thank you for your comments best Martin«
Comment on Jun 05, 2018

Fernando Gallardo commented on presentation 12 M Outcomes of the Veniti Vici Venous Stent System for iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis.

»Thanks for sharing your experience Pr Schroeder, excellent results. 1.In your opinion which are advantages of closed cells stents as Veniti VS other open cell stents also dedicated for Veins?? I have experience with Venovo, SinousVena and Sinous Oblikus, and Zilvervena for these cases of Thrombosis with MTS, and it seems that they all work well at 12 months, except Zilvervena that shows early re estenosis in MT compression point, but our group experience is only about 30 cases in 2 years. 2. About the use of temporary Cava filter? I saw in your presentation, I only use it when free thrombus in Cava or DVT associated with Pulmonary embolism, do you agree with this approach or you use in all acute cases?? Best regards Fernando«
Clinical investigation

12 M Outcomes of the Veniti Vici Venous Stent System for iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis

Dedicated vein devices might improve the outcomes of endovascular treatment for the treatment of acute and chronic deep vein thrombosis. This short presentation summarizes a 2 center experience with the Veniti Vici Venous Stent System.

May 31, 2018 2 Comments
Poll 01/10/2018 – 31/10/2018

Critical limb-threatening ischemia – CLI Global Society

Patient’s characteristics

 

Gender: Male

Age: 79 years old

Comorbidity: Arterial hypertension, hypercholesterinemia, chronic kidney disease (GFR: 53 ml/min/1,73m²), NYHA II, Coronary artery disease, previous CABG

Symptoms:  Toe ulceration of the left limb

Previous operations: None

ABI: incompressible, Toe pressure: 32 mmHg

Vascular Imaging – Duplex ultrasound: Isolated tibial vessel disease

Poll 13/04/2018 – 30/06/2018

Topic: Asymptomatic juxta- and pararenal aortic aneurysms

Patient’s characteristics

Gender: Female
Age: 75 years old
Comorbidity: Arterial hypertension, hypercholesterinemia, previous aortocoronary bypass grafting, previous myocardial infarction, previous smoker, peripheral arterial disease, atrial fibrillation
Symptoms: None
Previous operations: None

 

Aneurysm characteristics:

Max. aneurysm diameter: 54 mm

Length of proximal infrarenal neck: 0 mm

Distance between SMA and LRA: 20 mm

Diameter of renal arteries: RRA: 5,3 mm, LRA: 6 mm

Suprarenal angulation: 60°

Diameter of distal neck: 30 mm

Minimum diameter of common iliac arteries: R: 11 mm, L:9 mm

Maximum diameter of common iliac arteries: R: 11 mm, L: 14 mm

Minimum diameter of external iliac arteries: R: 7 mm, L: 6,2 mm