Nicola Troisi

MD, MHM
  • Function: Consultant
  • Speciality: Vascular Surgery
  • Country: IT
  • Working place: San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence, IT

Activities

Comment on Jan 22, 2019

Gladiol Zenunaj commented on presentation VRTD 2: Association between PTX-coated devices and overall mortality.

»Greetings, thanks for sharing your research. The authors are reporting that mortality paclitaxel- related is dependent on the dose loaded on the device. Do the authors think that mortality paclitaxel-related after 1 year could depend whether on the paclitaxel load transferred to vessel wall or the load lost in the bloodstream during the delivering of the device. If this could be related to the load of paclitaxel lost during the delivering it shuld urge the developement of better drug bonding to the device.«
Comment on Jan 14, 2019

Gladiol Zenunaj replied to your comment on presentation VRTD 2: Association between PTX-coated devices and overall mortality.

»Very interesting paper. However, if their findings are confirmed in other studies, I think it might have any impact on the PTX-devices use rather than reducing the number of endovascular procedures. Nowadays, the increasing age, number of comorbidities of patients we have to deal with, make an open approach unthinkable.«
Comment on Jan 14, 2019

Konstantinos Katsanos commented on presentation VRTD 2: Association between PTX-coated devices and overall mortality.

»RCTs were included only in the meta-analysis. The paclitaxel arms and the control arms had similar-comparable baseline demographics without any significant differences (please refer to Appendix of the paper in JAHA). Not all studies had the same periods of follow-up time. Hence, the different number of studies for each time point. Our raw data is available 'open access' in the paper for any body to double-check. Independent reviews are of course more than welcome.«
Comment on Jan 13, 2019

Giovanni Torsello commented on presentation VRTD 2: Association between PTX-coated devices and overall mortality.

»I am not a statistician. But the statement "the two group are identical" is wrong. The groups may be comparable. Randomization was for sure not done for life expectancy, but for lesion characteristics. We need the opinion of a statistician. The study was not accepted for publication in "high ranked" Journals. Why? Additionally, the comparison of many studies at the beginning and of a few studies at 2 and 5 years looks "strange" in my opinion. The studies were externally controlled by Independent committees. What is the reason why they did not find safety issues? It is a pity that these points were not addressed during the round table.«
Comment on Sep 04, 2018

Nicola Troisi replied to your comment on presentation TASC II D AORTO-ILIAC RECANALIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION WITH SELF-EXPANDABLE STENTS.

»Thank you Michel for your comments. Step by step... As regards as the right side the first approach was retrograde femoral but I was not able to recanalize the iliac axis. So, I decided to perform a crossover approach. In my mind, the third option should be the brachial approach with a long sheath. Then, the choice to stent left EIA was based on the preoperative CT-scan showing circumferential calcifications with critical stenosis in the distal part immediately above the circumflex arteries. Finally, about your answers I am agree with you even if in my center we have a large experience of iliac kissing stenting with self-expandable stents with good outcomes during a long-term follow-up. I use covered stents just in cases where large thrombus is present.«
Comment on Sep 03, 2018

Michel Bosiers commented on presentation TASC II D AORTO-ILIAC RECANALIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION WITH SELF-EXPANDABLE STENTS.

»Great case, Thanks for sharing! I have a few questions: - would you consider a transbrachial approach instead of cross-over: sometimes you don´t have enough pushability coming from cross-over. - was it necessary to stent the left EIA ? To answer your questions: - i prefer to use balloon expandable stents for the CIA, for the EIA i totally agree to use a self expandable. - if there is a large thrombus burden, i prefer to use covered stents, in this case with the strong calcification i think a non-covered stent should do the trick«
Case report

TASC II D AORTO-ILIAC RECANALIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION WITH SELF-EXPANDABLE STENTS

This case report describes a complex endovascular aorto-iliac recanalization and reconstruction in a TASC II D lesion. Many open questions are still present in this field, such as the role of open surgery, the necessity to use covered stents, and the neverending story between self- and balloon-expandable stents.

August 22, 2018 2 Comments
Poll 02/02/2019 – 28/02/2019

The acute limb ischemia

Patient’s characteristics

Gender: Female

Age: 65 years old

Comorbidity: Arterial hypertension, Dyslipidemia

Symptoms:  Acute onset of claudication (<2 weeks), Rutherford class 3 of the left limb

Previous operations: None

ABI: 0.5

DUS: Occlusion of the left popliteal artery

Poll 01/08/2018 – 31/08/2018

Asymptomatic carotid artery disease

Patient’s characteristics

 

Gender: Female

Age: 72 years old

Comorbidity: Arterial hypertension, hypercholesterinemia, previous smoker

Symptoms: None

Previous operations: None

Vascular Imaging of the left internal carotid artery: Duplex ultrasound with peak systolic velocity (PSV)> 230 cm/sec